Mockmill Grain Mill Review + Giveaway - Buttered Side Up

Mockmill Grain Mill Review + Giveaway


Note: Pleasant Hill Grain provided me with a Mockmill for review. All opinions are my own.

Mockmill Grain Mill Review

A couple of months ago, the folks at Pleasant Hill Grain contacted me and asked me if I would be interested in reviewing the Mockmill Grain Mill for KitchenAid (designed by Wolfgang Mock). Now that I've had a chance to give it some good use, I'd like to let you all know what I think of it!

I must admit that I was a bit skeptical of a KitchenAid attachment grain mill. I mean, could it really grind flour? But I saw that it was designed and manufactured in Germany, and that it uses ceramic grinding stones. So I decided to hold off judgement until I could test it out myself.

To my surprise, I was quite pleased with the performance of the Mockmill. I have made biscuits, cake, pancakes, and more baked goods with the flour I ground from it. I tested out both soft white and hard red wheat berries, and even my homemade sprouted (and dehydrated) wheat. You can grind other non-oily, dry grains, but I haven't given them a go yet. I'd love to grind corn for cornbread!

Let me give you a rundown on some of the pros and cons of this grain mill:

Pros:
  • * The Mockmill is quite small compared to other grain mills. When it's attached to the KitchenAid, it takes up very little extra space in your kitchen.
  • * It's super easy to attach, and works with all KitchenAid stand mixers. 
  • * It's very convenient to grind just the amount of flour you need for a recipe.
  • * The mill has a low grinding temperature, so it doesn't damage the nutrients of the grains.


Cons:
  • * You must remove the grain mill when you want to use your KitchenAid for other purposes.
  • * The mill shakes a bit when running, but this is minimized by tightening down the attachment screw properly.
  • * The mill doesn't grind the flour super-super fine, but it was great for my purposes. If you bake a lot of delicate, fine pastries, this might bother you, but I didn't find that it was a problem for me.


Let me show you how it works:

Mockmill Grain Mill Review
The mill attaches to KitchenAid quickly and easily.



Mockmill Grain Mill Review
You adjust the coarseness of the grind by twisting the front of the mill.

Note: the grain mill itself is pretty quiet, but my KitchenAid is fairly noisy. If you have a quiet stand mixer, I think this would have a low noise level.

Also, as far as I can tell, it is only sold in white, so you can't match it to your KitchenAid if it isn't white. This doesn't bother me, but I thought I'd note it.


Mockmill Grain Mill Review
Here is an example of the flour ground from soft white and hard red wheat on the finest setting.





Here's a video demonstration of the grinding process.

In closing thoughts, would I purchase the Mockmill grain mill?
Yes, I actually would! I had been wanting my own grain mill for quite some time, but I never considered a KitchenAid attachment. Now that I've tested it out, I think this is the mill I would purchase. Of course, it's not my ultimate, dream mill (I'd have to cough up at least $500 for that), but it works great for my purposes.

If you're looking for grains and beans to grind, Pleasant Hill sells a pretty wide variety. They also carry other grain mills and kitchen tools/appliances. I want this step stool for Helen.

GIVEAWAY

The folks at Pleasant Hill Grain would like to give away a Mockmill Grain Mill to one lucky Buttered Side Up reader!

U.S. and Canadian residents only, please!

You can enter below:




a Rafflecopter giveaway


GOOD LUCK!


50 comments

  1. I usually bake with whole grains at least once a week.

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  2. I use whole grains mostly in soups now but when I was younger I used to make cereal from whole grains quite often. I'd really like to start with that again.

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  3. I buy more things with whole grains than I bake. I would love this option to make my own!

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  4. I need to get better at eating whole grains. My eczema gets much better when I do. This would make it easier and more cost effective for me to do so. Thanks for the review! Never heard of a mill attachment for KitchenAid before.

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  5. I almost always use a mix of whole grains and white flour, because I haven't tweaked all my recipes to use whole grain.

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  6. I aim to bake with whole grains at least once a week and would love to add this grain mill to my toolkit!

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  7. Usually I bake whole grain bread at least once a week. I have had many attachments for my KitchenAid, but I never dreamed they would have a grain mill! I am kind of in love with the idea of being able to grind my own flour!

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  8. I bake with whole grains a bit but not as much as I'd like to so this mill would be great for me!

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  9. I bake with whole grains quite often! Almost weekly, if not more.

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  10. I grew up grinding wheat every Saturday to use throughout the week, and the worst part was cleaning the farm thing out - and I have the same type of mill today with the same problem. This looks like such a simple piece to clean in comparison!

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  11. I have quite a nice wheat grinder, but it is my food storage room in the basement. I takes up lots of counter space and I hate to drag it out for little recipes. This little mill looks great!

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  12. I always try to include whole grains in my baking & cooking. I eat brown rice, and I often replace white flour with whole wheat pastry flour in recipes. I also use ground oats and flaxmeal in several of my baked goods.

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  13. I love baking with whole grains and this looks like a great option. Thanks for the review!

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  14. I bake with whole grains several times a month. I did not know grinding your own flour could be so easy.

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  15. I use whole grains several times a week, but don't grind my own (yet) :)

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  16. I think the grain mill is awesome! Thanks for reviewing it.

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  17. almost all the time, but I confess that I use white flour for pizza.

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  18. almost all the time, but I confess that I use white flour for pizza.

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  19. I don't bake with whole grains that often. Maybe once every couple of months? My baking has really slowed down lately....
    I would love to grind corn for cornbread; how delicious!

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  20. I try to use them as much as I can but milling it myself would be better. Thanks for the chance to enter.

    Andrea D.
    short74717@msn.com

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  21. At least once a week. I have desire and plans to start growing my own organic grains. Would love to win this.

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  22. This is pretty cool! Thank you for including the video demonstration, I love to see things in action. I think having a way to make your own fresh flour at home sounds like such a healthy option rather than buying the stuff that has been sitting on a shelf for a while.

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  23. I buy whole grains all the time and just bought a mixer so maybe now I can bake with them myself!

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  24. I bake with whole grains every chance I get!

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  25. I'm always excited to see what's happening in your kitchen! Happy Fall!

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  26. I bake once every two weeks with whole grains!

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  27. A few times a year. I really should use whole grains more.

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  28. I've been trying to do more whole grains in a house full of kids who prefer WonderBread and refuse to eat anything remotely resembling whole grain...slowly working it into their diets! :)

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  29. I try to bake with whole grains every time I bake. I think I would be doing more baking if I could mill my own grains :)

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  30. I have just begun making my own breads and I think this would be incredible. Just imagine how yummy the bread would be. I mostly bake with whole grain but, with biscuits I used a combination.

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  31. I would say that I don't cook or bake with whole grains nearly enough, but since our little one has started solid foods, I have a big motivation to do it more often.

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  32. I love using whole grains in baking, if I remember I will try substitute at least some white flour in a recipe for a whole grain flour.

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  33. I like to throw them in my whole wheat bread when I'm baking. I actually didn't know there were grain mills that attached to the kitchenaid!

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  34. I would like very much to use more whole grains in our house. I cook most things from scratch and I think this might be the next step. :)

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  35. I would like very much to use more whole grains in our house. I cook most things from scratch and I think this might be the next step. :)

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  36. I bake weekly and would love a grinder!

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  37. I would have to say at least 2-3 times per week - shaunie

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  38. I would guess I use 70% white flour and 30% whole grain. I am a sporadic baker but am currently on a bread baking kick. Being able to grind grains as needed and store in whole grain form would be great for improving shelf life (and allow me to try more varieties)

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  39. I bake with whole grains about once a week Love to experiment

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  40. I am not experienced with whole grains, learning.

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  41. I love grains in my muffins!

    - Judith

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  42. I soak my grains, and use a hand grinder. However, I would really enjoy this one for my kitchen Aid!

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  43. I bake with whole grains several times a month.

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  44. I usually bake with whole grains once a week! Love to bake!

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  45. Hi! Just found this post while doing some research on the mock mill. How do you soak/sprout your grains and then dehydrate them before milling? After they have sprouted do you just lay them out on a paper towel to dry out? Thanks! I just received a kitchenaid classic for the holidays and am looking into different attachments.

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    Replies
    1. I use the tutorial over on the Weed 'Em and Reap blog. I'll have to share my own spin here on Buttered Side Up sometime.

      I dry my sprouted wheat in the oven. I'd like to invest in a dehydrator someday so I could use lower heat (my oven only goes down to 170).

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