Rømmegrøt (Milk and Flour Porridge) Recipe - Buttered Side Up

Rømmegrøt (Milk and Flour Porridge) Recipe


Rømmegrøt (Milk and Flour Porridge)

I remember the first time I ever heard of Rømmegrøt. We were eating lunch at my husband's family's house (this was long before we were married or even a couple). Reuben's grandparents also came to lunch, and his grandmother brought a crockpot of what they called "mush" or Rømmegrøt. I decided I'd better sample it, but by the time I went to dish myself some, it was gone. Devoured. 


Rømmegrøt (Milk and Flour Porridge)
My sister and I decided to recreate it ourselves. Someone had mistakenly called what Grandma Kastner made Rømmegrøt (I think the proper term is risengrynsgrøt, or rice porridge), so that was what we based our recipe on.

In any case, it was massively delicious. Like, it's difficult for me to describe just how yummy Rømmegrøt is. 

It's super rich, so you can only eat a small bowl (unless you're a grown man or growing boy). And you simply MUST serve it with melted butter and cinnamon-sugar on top.

Rømmegrøt (Milk and Flour Porridge)
Rømmegrøt has become a Christmas-morning tradition. My husband tried to convince me to make it for Thanksgiving, but I balked at the idea of serving (what I consider) a Christmas dish for Turkey Day. 

Since it's December, I made some for him last weekend. We gobbled it down. I can't wait to whip up another batch.

NOTE: We tried to recreate traditional Rømmegrøt, but I'm not sure this recipe is entirely authentic. Other recipes I've seen call for sour cream instead of sweet cream. I'd like to try that variety someday!

Also, one of my readers (Kari H.) pointed out that the actual name of this porridge is Fløyelsgrøt: velvet or butter porridge. 


Rømmegrøt (Milk and Flour Porridge) 
adapted from my sister's recipe | makes about 6-8 servings | PRINT

Ingredients:
  • 4 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) salted butter
  • 3/4 cup organic all-purpose flour or whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 cup pure maple syrup
  • Cinnamon-sugar, for topping

Directions:

Place the milk and cream in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Don't let it scorch! In a small saucepan, melt 1 stick of butter for on top of the Rømmegrøt. 

In a large pot over medium-low heat, melt the remaining 2 sticks of butter. Sprinkle in the flour and whisk until smooth and bubbly, about 3 minutes. 

Whisking constantly, pour in the hot milk and cream. Bring to a boil. Boil and stir 1 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in maple syrup.

Spoon into bowls and serve with a healthy drizzle of melted butter and a sprinkling of cinnamon-sugar. 



15 comments

  1. Looks delicious! Will have to try this!

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  2. This sounds so good! I haven't heard of it before but certainly need to try - especially after reading your description. Yum!

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    1. Yes, you should really give it a try! It's super yummy. :)

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  3. Where do you add the maple syrup? Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Oops - forgot to say when to incorporate the maple syrup. I updated the recipe. :)

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  4. Hi Erica!
    This is a traditional Christmas dish in Scandinavia, we call it Risengrød in Denmark and Risgrynsgröt in Sweden, however, we don't make it with flour, instead we boil Pearl rice with milk, cream and sugar and serve it the same way as you describe ( but no maple syrup). In our family we have a tradition of eating it on the eve before Christmas eve ( which is when we celebrate Christmas in Scandinavia), this year it will be very special since it is also our daughter Siri's first birthday that day :) Usually it is served alongside all the foods on Christmas eve as a dessert. You should try it with the rice, it's amazing!
    Merry Christmas!
    Anna

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    1. Thank you for letting us know about Risengrød/Risgrynsgröt, Anna! Do you have a recipe for it? I'd really like to give it a try!

      Happy birthday a little early to your daughter! This is such a fun time of year for children. :)

      Merry Christmas to you, too!

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  5. This looks so delicious. I plan to try it during the holidays. Thanks for sharing!

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  6. While it looks like the real thing, this isn't rømmegrøt - rømme means sour cream, and a sour cream porridge without sour cream just isn't sour cream porridge :) What you're making is fløyelsgrøt - literally velvet porridge, which is a kind of poor mans rømmegrøt. I googled for an English recipe (to see if I could get out of doing the measurement conversions), and this looks very close to the one we use. http://lisaeatsworld.com/2013/10/norwegian-sour-cream-porridge-rommegrot/ I love that you're trying out Norwegian cuisine, unfortunately Americans seem to mostly know about lutefisk, but we've got plenty more to offer that is a lot more delicious than wobbly fish ;)

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    1. Thank you for the clarification, Kari! I need to try that recipe you shared. And I would love to try out more Norwegian dishes. Do you have any that you recommend?

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  7. Well, if your daughter is anything like my two year old, fiskegrateng will be a big hit. It's one of the quintessential Norwegian comfort foods, and a staple in every home with kids in it. We had it on a weekly basis throughout my entire childhood. And luckily for me, someone else has done all the work of translating the recipe! http://thanksforthefood.com/fiskegrateng/ (the cheese she's added isn't traditional, but I'm going to try it the next I make fiskegrateng, because it sounds delicious!)

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  9. My native Norwegian grandparents made it this way (with sweet cream), and called it Rømmegrøt, so I'd say it's definitely authentic! :-) Thanks for sharing!

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